Gun Laws, State by State — Ohio

Note: As the United States passes its 350th mass shooting this year, more and more people are discussing gun control. While many seem to believe that registering all guns, requiring background checks for all purchases, and preventing identifiably dangerous people from purchasing guns are all good ideas, just as many seem to be afraid that any gun control law will mean the loss of all civilian guns. Organizations like the NRA play on these fears, telling people that guns are already too regulated and any further action will mean the loss of the much cherished 2nd Amendment (which is more for well-regulated militia than civilians, but that’s an argument for another day).

So I wanted to see what exactly the gun laws are in each state. Are guns too regulated? Do states with tight gun laws have more gun violence or less? What does it even take to get a gun nowadays? With these questions in mind, I’ll be starting a new weekly series – Gun Laws, State by State. I will try to document the most up-to-date gun laws in each state as well as provide facts on gun deaths in each state. Hopefully, by the time I get to the last state, we will all be better educated on gun control and gun deaths. If you have any additional information on the state in question, add it in the comments.

Previous post: Kentucky Continue reading

Adventures in Reading — December 21 — December 27, 2015

What did I read (and finish) this week? Look below to find out!

Against Football: One Fan’s Reluctant Manifesto by Steve Almond (2014) – In this short volume, Mr. Almond enumerates the various ways that football is destroying communities, physically, mentally, and psychologically damaging people, and benefiting off its players. It’s electrifying and hard to put down. I absolutely recommend it to anyone who wants to learn more about the NFL, college football, sports fanaticism, or good writing. Continue reading

Adventures in Reading — December 14 — December 20, 2015

What did I read (and finish) this week? Look below to find out!

Contagious: Why Things Catch On by Jonah Berger (2013) – This short book offers Jonah Berger’s insights into why things go viral/become popular and attempts to provide a step-by-step plan on how to replicate these results (imaginatively titled STEPPS). Interspersed are anecdotes on things that became viral and insight into how advertisers and companies manipulate us. It’s a good read but pretty terrifying. Great for citing the next time you want to rant against your friends for being “sheeple.” Continue reading

Personal Update

Greetings, readers.

As you may have noticed from the lack of updates over the last few days, I’m having trouble keeping up with my regular schedule.  Christmas is nearing, and I will be organizing, decorating, wrapping presents, traveling, cooking, visiting family, and having family visit me, so I’m going to change the update schedule for a bit.  For the next three weeks (through January 10), this will be the schedule:

Monday: Adventures in Reading

Wednesday: Gun Laws, State by State

Friday: Adventures in Links

Sunday: long-form post

Likewise, fellow contributor Drew is having some personal issues that make it difficult for him to write, so there will be no post from him this week (I know, I’m as sad as you are.).  However, he anticipates being able to post the second part of his interview with Jacob Sumners on January 3.  So at least we have that to look forward to!

Until then, I’ll be pinning and promoting a different, older post every day. Feel free to peruse the archives as well — there are almost 350 different posts to choose from!

So until tomorrow, Happy Holidays and thanks for your support!

— POM

Gun Laws, State by State — Kentucky

Note: As the United States passes its 350th mass shooting this year, more and more people are discussing gun control. While many seem to believe that registering all guns, requiring background checks for all purchases, and preventing identifiably dangerous people from purchasing guns are all good ideas, just as many seem to be afraid that any gun control law will mean the loss of all civilian guns. Organizations like the NRA play on these fears, telling people that guns are already too regulated and any further action will mean the loss of the much cherished 2nd Amendment (which is more for well-regulated militia than civilians, but that’s an argument for another day).

So I wanted to see what exactly the gun laws are in each state. Are guns too regulated? Do states with tight gun laws have more gun violence or less? What does it even take to get a gun nowadays? With these questions in mind, I’ll be starting a new weekly series – Gun Laws, State by State. I will try to document the most up-to-date gun laws in each state as well as provide facts on gun deaths in each state. Hopefully, by the time I get to the last state, we will all be better educated on gun control and gun deaths. If you have any additional information on the state in question, add it in the comments. Continue reading

Daily WTF: Saying a Horse Should Have Taken Serena Williams’ Sports Illustrated Title

If you know nothing about sports, you know that Serena Williams is an exceptional athlete. You know that she’s the top female tennis player in the world and has been for years. You know that she is a powerhouse. You know that she is gorgeous and aggressive. And you know that she is a champion.

A few things that you might not know: Serena Williams has won four Olympic gold medals. She has won the Grand Slam 21 times. She has won 36 major titles in her 20-year career. This year alone she has won 53 out of 56 matches and built up the largest ranking points gap between her and her next competitor in history. And she has done all of that while facing racist umpires, entire stadiums that have booed and insulted her, and opponents who pad their bras and underwear to mock her physique. As I said, she is a champion.

And yet, people find it hard to believe that she is more of a champion than a horse or that she deserves the Sports Illustrated Sportsperson of the Year more than one. Fucking typical. Continue reading

Adventures in Reading — December 7 — December 13, 2015

What did I read (and finish) this week? Look below to find out!

Ongoing manga:

Cherry Boy, That Girl by South Ant (ongoing) ch. 1 – 79 – Cherry Boy, That Girl is about Berry, a formerly obese girl, and her boyfriend Mandarin. When Berry becomes popular at school, she dumps Mandarin, who decides to get back at her by cross-dressing, stealing all her admirers, and making her life hell. However, when she decides she’s permanently done with his scheming and meets a new boy, Walnut, Mandarin goes a bit crazy. It’s not really a cross-dressing manwha, but it’s well written, beautifully drawn, and really interesting. At the end, it dissolves into typical rich kid nonsense, but I still really like it. Continue reading

Daily WTF: Kicking Women Out of a Homeless Shelter for Having Sex

Imagine that you are a homeless woman. Perhaps you had health problems that led to financial problems. Perhaps you are a victim of domestic violence and, having grown up in a community that prefers you become a wife instead of a provider, you don’t know how to take care of yourself after leaving your abusive spouse. Perhaps you have or had an addiction problem that made it difficult to take care of yourself or keep a job. Regardless of the situation, you are now homeless. To make matters worse, you have a two-year-old daughter to take care of.

Continue reading

The 34 Holidays in December

A core part of the ridiculous faux “War on Christmas” is the fact that many secularized organizations like schools, retailers, and restaurants will wish people a “Happy Holidays!” instead of a “Merry Christmas!” It is evidently just horribly rude to some Christians that said secularized organizations would completely “ignore” Christmas in favor of being “politically correct.” I mean, the reason for the season is totally Christmas, right?

Hmm, not exactly. While above 75% of Americans identify as Christians, they don’t all celebrate the same way, which means that some of them celebrate something other than Christmas or celebrate Christmas in different ways. In addition, non-Christians have their own holidays during December, which can be just as important to them as Christmas. So saying “Happy Holidays” isn’t necessarily an attack on Christmas – it’s just an acknowledgement that people will be celebrating about three dozen holidays during December. So why not wish them a happy holiday too? Are they not worthy of the courtesy? Our their holidays not important too?

So let’s learn about these holidays, shall we? Continue reading

Adventures in Links — December 11, 2015 (Mental Health)

Theme: Mental Health

As the holidays and winter approach, many people will experience mental health problems. These problems might be pre-existing, seasonal, temporary, or new and can be exacerbated by the stress of the holidays, unsupportive family members, financial problems, lack of sunlight, and cold. So to create a more supportive and understanding community, I’m going to post a few links about mental health. Continue reading